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Sindoor
Sindoor

Priyadarshini Misra
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Kumkum is considered to be very auspicious by Indians and thus used for various purposes on special occasions like wedding and festivals. Can anyone tell me the significance of wearing Sindoor by married women

Posted On : 3/30/2009 10:08:20 PM

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Anju Malhotra
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Sindoor is a red powder which is traditionally applied at the beginning or completely along the parting-line of a woman s hair also called mang or as a dot on the forehead. Sindoor is the mark of a married woman in Hinduism. Single women wear the dot in different colors bindi in Hindi but do not apply sindoor in their mang. Hindu widows do not wear the sindoor, signifying that their husband is no longer alive.The history of sindoor is believed to be very old it is a very traditional practice. It expresses a woman s desire for a long life for their husbands. The reason sindoor is red is because it comes from vermilion, and it is said to represent strength and love. A woman s initial experience with the sindoor is during their marriage ceremonies. The displaying of the sindoor is considered very important since the bride belongs to the groom. Many experts in Vedic traditions say that the sindoor is placed on the part of the hair at marriage to signify that the wife is now under the protection of her husband and that anyone who harms her would find that their blood would be shed. There are many Indian movies and dramas involving sindoor Sindoor Tere Naam Ka and the movie Sindoor released in 1987 with their themes revolving around the ritual s significance. Modern women seldom use sindoor on the forehead daily simply because it is inconvenient. Many choose to apply a small amount to the parting of the hair as a compromise between modern living and ancient tradition. In general, using sindoor is a Hindu tradition, and not followed by Muslim women. In the 19th century, sindoor was one of the rituals that a Sufi leader Sharafuddin Maneri had permitted Bangladeshi Muslim women to practice however, soon thereafter a reformist organization was established to eliminate it. Though most Indian women do continue to wear the bindi, it has become a decorative accessory often applied as a sticker. In early 2008, allegations of high lead content led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to reduce sales of Sindoor in malls.

Posted On : 4/2/2009 7:25:07 AM

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Maniam PS
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Wednesday, March 18, 2009
Sindoor also known as kumkum, was made with turmeric and alum or lime, or from other herbal ingredients , is a red powder which is traditionally applied at the beginning or completely along the parting-line of a woman s hair also called mang or as a dot on the forehead. Sindoor is the mark of a married woman in Hinduism. Single women wear the dot in different colors bindi in Hindi but do not apply sindoor in their mang. Hindu widows do not wear the sindoor, signifying that their husband is no longer alive. The history of sindoor is believed to be very old it is a very traditional practice. It expresses a woman s desire for a long life for their husbands. The reason sindoor is red is because it comes from vermilion, and it is said to represent strength and love. A woman s initial experience with the sindoor is during their marriage ceremonies. The displaying of the sindoor is considered very important since the bride belongs to the groom. Many experts in Vedic traditions say that the sindoor is placed on the part of the hair at marriage to signify that the wife is now under the protection of her husband and that anyone who harms her would find that their blood would be shed.

Posted On : 4/2/2009 9:17:17 AM

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Darshil Jal daru khanewala
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radition of wearing Sindoor or vermillion is said to have traveled through more than 5,000 years of Hindu culture. Female figurines excavated at Mehrgarh, Baluchistan, show that sindoor was applied to the partition of women s hair even in early Harappan times. Besides, legends says that Radha, the consort of Lord Krishna, turned the kumkum into a flame like design on her forehead. In the famous epic Mahabharata, Draupadi, the wife of the Pandavas, is believed to have wiped her sindoor in disgust and despair. Use of Sindoor has also been mentioned in The Puranas, Lalitha Sahasranamam and Soundarya Lahharis.

Posted On : 4/10/2009 12:39:48 AM

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smriti mukherjee
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sindoor is actually a sign of bondage attributed on women by men. in the prehistoric age when men used to forcefully abduct women from other groups they did make a cut mark on the women s forehead as a symbol of their power and victory. and the women with their bleeding forehead were chained with iron bangles. as time passed the bleeding and chaining system has lost its importance but we the women of 21st century still clings on the shameful symbols. society is really forceful enough to convert men s torture into women s love. bravo.

Posted On : 11/25/2013 8:25:04 AM

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